Adventure Park Review
Overall 7

If the memories of cleaning up vomit, bossing around a useless Handyman and watching a cart full of visitors flying off the track gives you a feeling of old school nostalgia, Adventure Park could be the game for you. The latest title to join the popular theme park sim attempts to bring the genre to a new generation but does Adventure Park hold enough attraction to warrant your time or is this one ride you will want to avoid? Check out Gamers Heroes Adventure Park honest game review

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Adventure Park Review

If the memories of cleaning up vomit, bossing around a useless Handyman and watching a cart full of visitors flying off the track gives you a feeling of old school nostalgia, Adventure Park could be the game for you. The latest title to join the popular theme park sim attempts to bring the genre to a new generation but does Adventure Park hold enough attraction to warrant your time or is this one ride you will want to avoid? Check out Gamers Heroes Adventure Park honest game review.

As a reviewer I always attempt to approach a game with an open mind. I don’t like to impose unfair expectations or comparisons on a new game but with Adventure Park, I really struggled. Simply viewing the art available on Steam made it quite clear that it was an attempt to offer a different take on the popular theme park sim genre and as a massive Theme Park fan, I found myself with incredibly high expectations but in all honesty, I was expecting to be disappointed.

I’m happy to admit that I was totally wrong. Within minutes of starting the Campaign in Adventure Park I was instantly reminded of the hours I wasted away in similar titles and the developers have done an amazing job at making everything feel familiar. Those of you that have played Roller Coaster Tycoon, Theme Park and other titles in the genre will feel comfortable with the controls and features within minutes of starting the game. This meant I was able to forgo the painful task of familiarizing myself with new controls and instead explore what content the game had to offer.

The aforementioned Campaign Mode is far from the main attraction but diving straight into the Free Play Mode is sure to result in disaster. So I began what I expected to be an in-depth campaign mode with challenges and goals although it wasn’t quite as deep as I was hoping for. The Campaign Mode is very short featuring only 5 unique missions, one of which is the tutorial, each providing more difficult challenges than the last. The challenges are so frustrating that I would be surprised if any single player reported a happy experience at the end of it. The visitors report their feelings via an in-game menu but even with 100% satisfaction and positive comments, my park would not reach the required level to progress. I had this exact same experience with many of the objectives throughout the campaign, creating a thoroughly disappointing and frustrating experience. The missions also place far too many restrictions. I’m constructing my theme park in the middle of an arid desert but I’m forced to use pirate themed rides and decorations? Adding more theme options to the rides would have gone a long way to creating more variety in the Campaign Mode.

Although I wasn’t overly impressed with the Campaign Mode itself, it did wet my appetite for what was ahead. I dove into the Free Play Mode and was treated to one hell of an experience. Removing the mundane restrictions and objectives from Campaign Mode I was free to build the park of my dreams. Although Free Play Mode suggests complete freedom, I did have the option to unlock additional rides and attractions as I progressed, a very welcome challenge that felt rewarding every step of the way.

As with previous titles in the genre you’re expected to manage every aspect of your park. Hiring of staff, such as mechanics, cleaners and gardeners; construction and maintenance of rides and attractions and ensuring your customers have the more important amenities are just some of the tasks that will take up your time. The price of rides and admission accompanied with the upkeep costs of rides, decorations and plants must be balanced alongside your income to ensure a clear financial route to success. This offers a deep yet easy-to-learn financial micro-management system that flows throughout the game without ever feeling too obtrusive or irrelevant.

The real shine in Adventure Park comes with the choice. There are literally millions of potential ways to construct your dream theme park. You control every area of construction, from laying down paths and trees to creating specially themed corners for specific rides or attractions. The terraform tools allow you to manipulate every area of your park, creating valleys, lakes, hills, practically any terrain you can think of.

The rides and other attractions in Adventure Park are what really set the game apart from its competitors. They are far more detailed than what’s commonly seen in the genre and the animations and effects flow flawlessly. Even when you zoom into first-person view and explore your park, it looks great every step of the way.

Sadly there are a few shortfalls with the game. The roller-coaster construction is a little clunky and a bit lackluster. Other than constructing the base track itself the game doesn’t feature loops or corkscrews and only really allows minor improvements with tunnels and special effects. The rides, although great in quality, are too few and far between. I was able to play for around 20 hours before running out of ideas in regards to themed sections of the park but it’s nothing a little DLC won’t fix.

As a huge Theme Park fan I had a great time with Adventure Park. Although it deserves to be reviewed as a game in itself the obvious comparisons players will make to Theme Park will leave some of you with a sour taste. The lack of sound effects from the park and visitors remove the atmospheric experience from other games in the genre and Adventure Park doesn’t quite boast the number of rides and attractions in other titles.

This honest game review of Adventure Park was based on the PC version. Digital code provided by the developers.