Bite at the Museum Review
Overall 65

Museums are typically stuffy affairs, but Dinobyte Studios adds some prehistoric excitement into the mix with their new title Bite at the Museum. There’s no denying the allure of dinosaurs and mayhem, but does this T-rex in a china shop manage to make an impression?

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Bite at the Museum Review

Museums are typically stuffy affairs, but Dinobyte Studios adds some prehistoric excitement into the mix with their new title Bite at the Museum. There’s no denying the allure of dinosaurs and mayhem, but does this T-rex in a china shop manage to make an impression?

Bite at the Museum Review

Things start to go amiss when a sentient time machine named Tim gets fed up with his surroundings. Stuck in a museum with a bunch of fogeys, he sets out to get his revenge by transporting a tiny T-rex named Tony into its hallowed halls.

This is where the player comes in. As this green reptile, players are given free reign over their surroundings, with only one goal in mind: smash anything and everything that surrounds you. Thankfully, there’s no shortage of things to break; vases, macro memes, and plenty of other valuable trinkets can all be destroyed almost instantaneously. The world is your oyster, and almost anything you see can be absolutely decimated.

To do Tim’s dirty work, players can utilize a pretty standard control scheme. Movement uses the typical WASD movement style, with biting and eating mapped to the left and right mouse buttons respectively. Players will also be able to sprint and spin to knock that precious vase off of a pedestal with style, but what you see with the control scheme is what you get. It’s not overly complex, but then again, it doesn’t have to be.

As players destroy things and rack up combo multipliers, they’ll be able to fill their Destructometer along the way. Once it fills to the brim, players will be able to make it to the next exhibit. It’s best to work quickly though, as daybreak will cause the game to end. No need to worry though; the meter fills quickly without it feeling too much like a grind. The average playthrough runs about 10 minutes as well, which proves to be just the right amount of time for something with as simple a presence as this. Just be warned that there are no achievements to speak of or anything else to encourage repeat visits to its exhibits.

It’s just a shame that Bite at the Museum is a bug-riddled affair. Tony would constantly teleport from place to place, clipping through walls and navigating tight passageways with the title’s poor camera. For most of our initial playthrough, a table was stuck on this poor T-rex for a good 75% of the time. There were no crashes, but this is one title that could have used a good spitshine of polish.

Sometimes you need a AAA epic to get lost in, and sometimes you just need some good ol’ fashioned dumb fun. Bite at the Museum most definitely fills in the shoes of the latter, doing exactly what it says on the tin and nothing more.

This review of Bite at the Museum was done on the PC. The game was freely downloaded.
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