Brain 43℃ Review
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WardenCat and CoughCat Software team up to tell a surreal tale in their new visual novel Brain 43℃. There’s no denying that this game is unique, but just because it’s unique doesn’t mean it’s good

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Brain 43℃ Review

WardenCat and CoughCat Software team up to tell a surreal tale in their new visual novel Brain 43℃. There’s no denying that this game is unique, but just because it’s unique doesn’t mean it’s good.

Brain 43℃ Review

In Brain 43℃, you don’t so much as play it as you read it. A visual novel through and through, players will progress by reading the text at the bottom of the screen, looking at different black-and-white sketches, and listening to the ambient sounds on a loop.

Since the game lives and dies by its story, how does that fare? Not too well.

For one, the short script is rife with typos and grammatical errors. One-off errors are excusable; paragraphs of broken English are not. A simple edit could have fixed things quite a bit, and some of the things that were not caught are laughable. It takes away from the game, not only making it harder to follow but also taking you out of the story.

It’s not like this is the easiest tale to digest either. Brain 43℃ is one flowery tale that borders on pretentious. After players choose between two doors to go through, the inner dialog of a person talks about how he wants to leave a cage. After breaking free, he comes across thoughts turning into fish, women who turn into fish, and rainy umbrellas. Sounds of rainfall tend to be on loop, and somehow sound worse than the samples found on sites like Rainy Mood.

Brain 43 C - Gamers Heroes

The game touches upon thoughts of “decadence, loss, negative, and helplessness” (in its own words), but it falls into the trap of telling rather than showing. It’s a verbal vomit of words, one done without much thought regarding cohesion or clarity. In a sense, it feels like this game was designed for the creator’s own benefit, rather than the benefit of others.

It’s not like you’ll be in the world of Brain 43℃ for long either. Though it is made up of a number of chapters, we were able to finish the game in around 20 minutes. The game automatically closes after you complete it, and reopening it prevents you from playing it again. Short of deleting your data, there is no other way. The creator might be making a statement by doing this, but it is a huge oversight and a slap in the face for something as short as this.

Brain 43℃ is a poorly made visual novel. The blatant grammatical errors and pretentious tone do not do the game any favors, and make its already short length feel like an eternity.

This review of Brain 43℃ was done on the PC. A digital copy was purchased.
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