Devil Guns Review
Overall 3

It’s you versus the world in Drunken Apes’ free-for-all arena-based shooter Devil Guns. Over-the-top shooters like Painkiller and Serious Sam have set the standard in the industry – can this title keep up?

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Devil Guns Review

It’s you versus the world in Drunken Apes’ free-for-all arena-based shooter Devil Guns. Over-the-top shooters like Painkiller and Serious Sam have set the standard in the industry – can this title keep up?

Devil Guns Review

The ultimate objective of this game is simple and straightforward enough for everybody to understand. There are guns and swords, and an endless stream of enemies that needs to be vanquished. There’s no plot to speak of, no cutscenes, and certainly no fluff – just endless demon killing, complete with a death tally.

It’s just a shame that this demon killing is as dull as dishwater. For one, the enemies don’t prove to be a challenge. Your typical skeletons, spiders, minotaurs, and other archetypes make their appearance, and all just shamble toward the player. There were times where we didn’t even fire a single shot, and the enemies just got in our face without landing a single blow.

It’s not like the weaponry is inspired either. Though each one may look unique, your typical shotguns, assault rifles, and sniper rifles round out the lot. The feedback from each gun is largely disappointing as well – unlike a title like Doom, there is no satisfying feedback from taking each of these baddies down. Some weapons, like the aforementioned sniper rifle, don’t make any sense either. When there are no vantage points or fine aiming, firing one bullet into a crowd of 10 enemies at point blank range makes absolutely no sense.

Devil Guns - Gamers Heroes

Stages come off as uninspired too. Though only the woods are unlocked, players can unlock a temple, a crypt, hell, and a fifth stage later on. Most of them (outside of hell) look the same, and don’t have any defining gimmicks or distinct looks to them. If anything, the design of some stages is a detriment – the main character slows to an absolute standstill when approaching a small set of stairs. There are no vantage points, no hiding spots, no unique characteristics – just a sword in the middle and some treasure chests with guns in them.

Rounding out the package are some nasty bugs. Menus would hang, guns wouldn’t reload, and characters would get stuck. This review was done based off of the “Nightmare Update” of the game, so we shudder to think of how the game originally was.

Devil Guns is an uninspired shooter with a mountain of bugs. Even the most diehard fans of the genre can safely pass on this one without missing anything of significance.

This review of Devil Guns was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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