Devil May Cry 5 Review
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After the mediocre reception to DmC: Devil May Cry, Capcom looks to revitalize the series with a proper sequel in Devil May Cry 5. Can this new game wash out the taste of the reboot, or is the series forever tainted? Check out our review and find out

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Devil May Cry 5 Review

After the mediocre reception to DmC: Devil May Cry, Capcom looks to revitalize the series with a proper sequel in Devil May Cry 5. Can this new game wash out the taste of the reboot, or is the series forever tainted? Check out our review and find out.

Devil May Cry 5 Review

I’ll start by saying I am not the biggest fan of the series. I have only played the first Devil May Cry and the DmC reboot.

The story begins with Nero and V entering a large demon tree called Qlipoth, which is spewing out demons into the real world. Nero is a Devil Hunter, while V is described as a mysterious stranger with demon powers. The pair enter the tree to lend aid to Dante, an elite Devil Hunter who is facing the Demon King in the center of the tree. You start the game as Nero, but will eventually play as all three of these characters. There is a brief tutorial section before you find Dante and attempt to aid him in the fight. Nero has lost his arm before entering the tree, and has lost some of his power as a result. The duo gets in the way of Dante, and he basically kicks them out of the tree while he fights the Demon King alone.

Fast forward a year, and Nero is still facing demons from the tree all over the world. During this year, his partner Nico has developed the Devil Breaker arms for him to use in place of his missing arm. These Devil Breakers power him up tremendously, and with them, he is confident he can help Dante in the Qlipoth tree. The two group back up with V and fight their way back to the tree, taking separate paths on levels but still meeting up at the end. Nero is determined to prove that he is not just dead weight in the fight against the Demon King. The game will run you about 12-15 hours, depending on the difficulty, but could run you much longer if you want to get all the secrets.

DMC 5 Review

If you are looking for a super serious group of demon hunters, then you have chosen the wrong game. Nero and Dante are incredibly immature and toss out silly one-liners to demons and each other at any given chance. V is a little more held back and reserved, but he also recites poetry in the middle of a demon invasion. Nico crashes her van into the demon tree and arrives at your destination just by you calling her from a payphone. The ridiculousness doesn’t stop there, though I don’t want to ruin the best parts. If you are playing Devil May Cry 5, buckle up bucko – you are in for one crazy ride.

Devil May Cry has always been about the combat, and for better or worse Devil May Cry 5 does not disappoint. While the series is about crazy combat and combos, I also feel that combat is the main reason novice players avoid the games. Thankfully, that is rectified by giving players the option to fight on auto and look stylish while doing so. You will never get the best score doing this, but you can easily beat the game with this strategy. I admit that I was on auto for close to eight missions before switching to manual…except for V, who was kept on auto. As one of those novices who was worried about the combat being too complicated, I have to say that the manual combat feels so much better. I never looked quite as good as I did using auto combat, but gameplay felt a lot better.

Let’s break down the combat a little bit more. There are times where you look at the skill list, and you will think it is a fighting game, as the combos can get very deep. Nero and Dante both are melee fighters, but you have to factor in Devil Breakers for Nero and styles for Dante. V fights at a distance using his demons, so you have to keep an eye on the battle and him at the same time. Unfortunately, this proved to be a bit too much for me. In addition, V auto racks up scores multipliers fairly easy. Juggles, air combat, weapon switches, ranged shots, and grapples are all part of the battles. As I said, it can feel overwhelming to a new player. Still, the first time I pulled off a crazy combo with Nero and starting flying on his arm like a surfboard, I lost my mind. I personally feel auto-combat makes Devil May Cry 5 a worse game, even if it does open up the series to more players.

The final score is tallied at the end, and players will receive red orbs based on that score. These orbs are used to buy new skills, buy blue orbs that increase HP, buy new Devil Breakers for Nero, and buy gold revive crystals. You can also earn blue orbs and purple orbs by finding their fragments during levels. These are often well hidden, along with secret missions in certain levels. The secret missions will net you extra blue orb fragments for completing them. These range from killing enemies, platform challenges, and even killing enemies with only one bullet. Though I found them all, I was not able to complete them all – good luck to all those who try.

Devil May Cry 5 Honest Review

The trouble with the secrets is how Devil May Cry 5 is set up. It is a very linear game, and secrets and collectibles are easy to miss. Here is how most levels go: Players enter the level, follow the path, enter a large room, fight demons, find secrets, and finally fight a boss. My biggest problem with this is that there are points of no return. For example, you jump down a hole and can’t go back up that hole to explore for secrets. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that there is no map. If you want to go back, you have to reload a checkpoint or start the mission over completely. I personally think it would benefit from a more open format with an interconnected world, as opposed to linear missions.

I mentioned earlier that the levels are split up, with V taking a path and Nero taking another. While playing as Nero, you will sometimes see V in the distance fighting, and vice versa. If you are playing online, then another person will be playing the second character. At the end of the level, you can give them a thumbs up if they performed well or not rate them if you don’t think they did well. You don’t really see them fighting, but their score for a fight will pop up on your screen, so you know if they did good or not. If you get enough ratings you are rewards with more Gold Orbs, which let you come back to life if you die.

I was playing the game on the PlayStation 4 Pro, and this title is quite the looker. I did not run into any frame drops or any crashes during my playthrough, though I did have some camera issues when I was to close to walls or other objects. These are uncommon, but you should expect to run into them from time to time.

Devil May Cry 5 converted me from a skeptic to a believer. Old fans and new alike will find something to enjoy in this title.

This review of Devil May Cry 5 was done on the PlayStation 4 Pro. A game code was provided by the publisher.
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