Go Go Poncho! Review
Overall 3

Luchador wrestling meets sumo wrestling in Couchgaming’s arena-based multiplayer brawler Go Go Poncho! Though many games are better with friends, this most certainly is not one of them

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Go Go Poncho! Review

Luchador wrestling meets sumo wrestling in Couchgaming’s arena-based multiplayer brawler Go Go Poncho! Though many games are better with friends, this most certainly is not one of them.

Go Go Poncho! Review

The ultimate goal of Go Go Poncho! Is simple – knock your opponent out of the ring, or make them hit a hazard. Each player has a dash button with a charge function, one that can be aimed at other characters to slam into them.

However, even though there are four different characters that vary based on strength, speed, and “recover,” the controls put up quite the fight. For one, all action is locked in eight different directions. This makes maneuvering difficult, and what could have been an intuitive setup like the one found in Mario Party is rigid and tough here. In addition, many of the seven arenas are much too small – when four players (the only amount that can be used) are thrown into the mix, it makes an already small battlefield even smaller. Chaos is commonplace…one that does not lead to high level play.

This is made that much worse with the stage hazards in each area. Bulls, mine carts, and inflatable ducks go around (or even through) each arena, instantly killing anybody that they touch. Though each player has three lives, they can go quite quickly when things get heated. Those that are out of the game can through “good” or “bad” pinatas that can make things better or worse for your opponents, but it is the equivalent of turning on the cheapest items in Super Smash Bros. The fact that you cannot turn this feature off makes things that much more frustrating.

Go Go Poncho - Gamers Heroes

Outside of Quick Play, there are some different options to be found in its “Challenge” mode. Included are “King of the Hill” (self explanatory), “Minute Madness” (which has you getting as many kills as you can within a minute), “Infected” (which has players transferring an infection), and “Pinata Trouble” (which has players evading lethal pinatas). While these options are welcome, there are not a lot of variables that can be tweaked, and the serious lack of characters and stages makes things stale quite fast. Paired with the fact that there is no online functionality or difficulty modes to choose from, and you’ve got a pretty bare bones package in play here.

Rounding these off is a presentation that is fairly rough around the edges. The sound design could have used a lot of work. Horns are played off key, sound samples are muffled, and everything comes across as jarring. The optimization could have used some fine tuning as well – our computer crashed after just 20 minutes of play on our initial go-around.

Go Go Poncho! has got a novel concept with its ring-based mechanics, but the lack of attention-to-detail is blatantly apparent. Things just aren’t balanced here, and the lack of options will keep you from playing with your buds in the long term.

This review of Go Go Poncho! was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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