Himno Review
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David Moralejo Sánchez and GrabTheGames bring peace to the world of platforming with the new title Himno. With no enemies and no urgency, should you get lost in its world?

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Himno Review

David Moralejo Sánchez and GrabTheGames bring peace to the world of platforming with the new title Himno. With no enemies and no urgency, should you get lost in its world?

Himno Review

Players take control of a pixelated warrior that makes his way through a number of different districts. Thrown into a dark world, he must wall jump, dash, and perform all sorts of platforming acrobatery to get to the next area. It’s pretty simple stuff, and what is here is nothing out of the ordinary. Some mechanics are oddly designed, like the wall jump that pushes you away, but those raised by childhood heroes like Mario will take to the game like a plumber to coins – especially with a controller.

It’s just a shame that all levels are procedurally generated. Some may see this as a boon, since no two playthroughs are the same. However, this uniqueness leads to a lack of personality. With the aforementioned darkness in play, it can be tough to figure out where to go. When paired with sections that spring you in the air or supercharge your dash, it can get somewhat frustrating. Some layouts have odd designs too, stacked vertically or with non-vertical walls. As a result, each stage lacks the character to make it stand out.

To break things up in Himno, players will be able to level up as they play. Experience is earned by doing all actions, like collecting gems and lighting torches, and players will be able to rise the ranks fairly quickly. Some wisps can be unlocked by being a certain level, but these do not substantially break things up.

Note that there are no enemies in this game, but the pit of water at the bottom will put a stop to your run. It doesn’t matter if you went through one district or 10 – all players will start back at the beginning of the game when succumbing to this hazard. Players can regain one of the wisps they picked up before starting over, but little other comfort is provided.

This normally wouldn’t be so bad, but some parts require blind leaps of faith. One wrong jump, and it could mean the end of your seemingly successful run. When paired with the odd dash or crummy terrain, it can make things a little unfair.

To keep players coming back, there are a handful of achievements to be had. Players will be able to unlock them by reaching a certain level or passing through a number of districts – basically anything accomplish-based. The game also keeps track of a number of different actions the player makes, for the data nerds among us.

Though Himno prides itself on its relaxed atmosphere, its lack of direction paired with its procedurally generated worlds fail to leave a lasting impression. As a result, it is only worth it for the most diehard of platforming fans.

This review of Himno was done on the PC. The game was freely downloaded.
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