Light Fantastik Review
Overall 5

The world of platformers is turned on its head with Hayali’s new title Light Fantastik. Offering an alternate world with its own unique rules, should you see what lies on the other side?

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Light Fantastik Review

The world of platformers is turned on its head with Hayali’s new title Light Fantastik. Offering an alternate world with its own unique rules, should you see what lies on the other side?

Light Fantastik Review

From the story to the graphics to even the gameplay, everything is done in a minimalistic style in Light Fantasik. After a happy village comes down with a sickness, it’s up to one citizen to set out on a journey for the cure.

As a little cube being, you can jump and take a look into a parallel world. In said parallel world, the controls are reversed and you can jump higher. To make it to the end of each stage, players must traverse between the two worlds, frequently switching along the way. This isn’t the deepest title around – there are no wall jumps, attack moves, or anything else to make it stand out. Rather, the key to victory is to carefully land jumps and to build momentum between the two worlds.

This isn’t as intuitive as one may think though. The hitbox on both characters is somewhat odd, meaning that players will fall to their doom, run into enemies, hit spikes, and re-do platforming sections. Some levels are vertical in nature, and when paired with a strict time limit, it makes things that much more difficult. There is the ability to extend the amount of time you have with specific power-ups, but expect to play some of the same levels multiple times before figuring out exactly what needs to be done.

Light Fantastik - Gamers Heroes

Things are made somewhat worse when seeing what the parallel world has to offer. Sure, your character can jump higher, but said inverted controls and the impending darkness make an already challenging platformer that much more difficult. This is made that much worse with specific portals – one may make you constantly jump, while another forces you to roll nonstop. The level design is not the most intuitive either – arrows saying “Go” mark the world, breaking the principle of “show, don’t tell.” These tweaks to the formula, though unique, ultimately take away from the game.

The 60 main levels of the game each feature a different challenge, and thankfully can be played out of order to a point as levels are unlocked. There is the ability to create your own stages, which can then be shared on Steam Workshop. There are not a ton of options, but it is still a welcome addition.

Light Fantastik has got an interesting premise, but the tweaks made to the platforming formula ultimately take away from the game. Those that can stomach its trial and error gameplay and odd quirks may enjoy what is present here, but the less patient among us are better off skipping this one.

This review of Light Fantastik was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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