Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight Review
Overall 8

Playism and Bomb Service’s Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight takes a look at what an exploration-heavy Castlevania game would look like in this day and age. Should you brave its cursed town, or is it just a miserable little pile of secrets?

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Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight Review

Playism and Bomb Service’s Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight takes a look at what an exploration-heavy Castlevania game would look like in this day and age. Should you brave its cursed town, or is it just a miserable little pile of secrets?

Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight Review

Though it is the fourth game in the Momodora series, Reverie Under the Moonlight is a standalone tale with its own separate story. Players take control of Koha, a priestess who ventures into Karst City to seek counsel with the queen. The land is cursed, and she is on a mission to seek out a cure. Things aren’t what they seem, however, and friends can quickly turn into enemies. Though the story is simple and told through brief conversations with people, it is still a solid tale that sets the dark and somber mood.

If anything, the game truly excels at its atmosphere. A standard five-hour run will have players traversing monasteries, subterranean graves, abandoned cities, and trap-laden zones. The excellent sprite work makes everything stand out, and everything is animated with many frames of animation. The music complements the graphical qualities too, taking a more subdued role in proceedings.

The world of Reverie Under the Moonlight is an interconnected one, similar to the maps found in Super Metroid and Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. Players will seek out secrets, pick up keys, collect upgrades (in the form of four crest fragments), and even gain the ability to turn into a cat. It is fairly easy to sequence break things and end up in an area full of secrets you cannot access yet. The ability to traverse between “bell” save points later on makes it easier to explore its world and make sure the map is explored 100%. This freedom is welcome though, as the world packs a good amount of secrets in the form of health upgrades, “ivory bugs,” and hidden boss fights.

Momodora Review - Gamers Heroes

Speaking of boss fights, the ones found in Reverie Under the Moonlight will put your skills to the test. Koha packs a roll, a maple leaf with a three hit combo, and a bow and arrow, all of which are used religiously throughout the game. Attacks hit fast and hard, and seeing a game over after two hits is not uncommon. An upgradable Estus Flask-like system a la Dark Souls is available, but stopping to replenish your health with it can often be a death wish in the heat of battle.

One of the only downsides of the game comes in the form of its weaponry. Though the maple leaf and bow can be upgraded, there aren’t any alternative weapons available. In addition, due to the game’s length, the map is much smaller than the massive castles found in the Castlevania series. What is here is solid enough, but those looking for a world to get lost in for weeks on end will be surprised at the brevity of this adventure.

Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight combines the best elements of Castlevania, Dark Souls, and even Shantae to create something great. What it lacks in scale it more than makes up for in attention to detail and care.

This review of Momodora: Reverie Under the Moonlight was written based on the PlayStation 4 version of the game. A digital code was provided by the publisher.