Robot Island Review
Overall 75

The life of a robot flight attendant is never easy, as can be seen in New Beings visual novella Robot Island. Although life has thrown this metallic fellow a curve ball, should players dive into its strange world and persevere?

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Robot Island Review

The life of a robot flight attendant is never easy, as can be seen in New Beings visual novella Robot Island. Although life has thrown this metallic fellow a curve ball, should players dive into its strange world and persevere?

Robot Island Review

Players begin their new life as Nim model 6636, who has been programmed to be a flight attendant. This robot contains an emotional recognition program, which responds based on people’s emotional states – just the thing for that empathetic touch.

However, Nim gets sent off to a transport ship that’s been converted into a freight vessel. Rather than a group full of people, shipping boxes fill up all compartments of the ship. Rather, the only person onboard is Captain Joachim, who is trying to make the best of his isolation. What follows is a five day excursion between the two where they both get to learn about each other a bit more.

It’s a short but sweet tale that handles its story quite well. Though there is a lot of busywork with the gameplay – get ready to hunt down some coffee beans – the interactions Nim has with each element of his environment prevent it from being too much of a drag. Players can click around to guide Nim along his way, and each clickable object sheds a bit more light about its world. There are also achievements tied with being thorough (and talking to plants on a regular basis – don’t ask), so it helps to take your time and see everything this world has to offer.

Robot Island also makes use of a dialog system that contains a number of different choices. As players talk with Joachim, they can choose to throw chess matches, be a mixologist, be robotic, or get to know him on a deeper level. The overall story does not change dramatically based on what you choose, but it is still a welcome addition that adds to its world.

When paired with its atmosphere, this world of Robot Island is truly one of a kind. The low poly look stands out, and while there isn’t a lot of ship to see, what is here is truly future chic. Character portraits are done well, and there is a fair amount of polish in everything from the UI to the movement.

It’s just a shame that the game is over before it even begins. Clocking in at around 30 minutes, players will see most of what this title has to offer in the same amount of time it takes to watch a sitcom. It’s a shame that there’s little variety between playthroughs, but the low price point makes it an easier pill to swallow.

Robot Island is a short but sweet adventure featuring a sci-fi world rife with emotion. Though it is full of fetch quests and runs a bit short, visual novel and point-and-click fans alike will enjoy this far out tale.

This review of Robot Island was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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