Steel Arena: Robot War Review
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Have you ever played a game that is so generic that you don’t remember a single thing about it? Although Real Fighting’s new title Steel Arena: Robot War has got horde-based gameplay with giant robots and heavy firepower, it’s easy to see that no effort went into making it stand out

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Steel Arena: Robot War Review

Have you ever played a game that is so generic that you don’t remember a single thing about it? Although Real Fighting’s new title Steel Arena: Robot War has got horde-based gameplay with giant robots and heavy firepower, it’s easy to see that no effort went into making it stand out.

Steel Arena: Robot War Review

Boot up Steel Arena: Robot War, and you’ll see that there is not much to the game. Players can either upgrade their bipedal mech or participate in the main game. Multiplayer modes are MIA, there are no leaderboards, and nothing else really stands out.

Those that take on the main mode will quickly realize that there is not much there either. The entirety of the game takes place on one map without any variables to choose from. There are no difficulty modes, spawn points, power-ups, or anything else to choose from. Rather, everybody will face the same waves of enemies that spawn on the opposite side of the map.

There’s not much strategy or depth to the game either. The ultimate goal of the game is to destroy all enemies and protect your base (with its health labeled as “health base”). Though you have unlimited lives, the game is over once the base is destroyed.

Any semblance of balance is thrown out the window once the enemies start spawning. Rather than create an AI for each fighter, all baddies just walk forward, firing away at anything and everything. It’s not like players will have much to work with either. Other than two weapons, a simple WASD setup is all players will have to work with. Forget about dodging, strafing, or even jumping – simply moving around is an exercise in patience.

This lack of balance extends to the weaponry as well. There is no way to manually reload, and the default gun only has one bullet per shot. Said bullet does not do much damage, and players will be quickly outgunned before upgrading. However, changing it to a machine gun will give you enough bullets to last through a number of enemies before reloading. The average player will be able to stand stationary in one area, mowing down the masses without much style or finesse.

Players can grab said machine gun (and other upgrades) with money earned from waves. There are a number of things that can be upgraded, including weaponry, legs, and even the color of your mech. The grind is real, and most players won’t bother due to the subtle changes each upgrade brings.

Absolutely no effort went into Steel Arena: Robot War. Everything here feels like it was made with stock assets, making it feel more like a school project than a quality title.

This review of Steel Arena: Robot War was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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