Super Inefficient Golf Review
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Playing a game of golf with a set of clubs is so last century. 34BigThings’ Super Inefficient Golf allows players to hit the links with a set of mines, but is this unorthodox way of playing fun or a good walk spoiled?

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Super Inefficient Golf Review

Playing a game of golf with a set of clubs is so last century. 34BigThings’ Super Inefficient Golf allows players to hit the links with a set of mines, but is this unorthodox way of playing fun or a good walk spoiled?

Super Inefficient Golf Review

The 18 holes found in Super Inefficient Golf take more cues from mini golf than golf proper. Gone are the sweeping ranges, replaced instead with curves, fans, and exploding barrels. It definitely errs on the side of outrageous, but it goes well with its premise.

Those looking to get a low score best learn how the game’s mine setup works. Rather than whacking the ball to the hole, players are given a set amount of mines that they slap onto their ball. Available in four different colors, setup can be as complex or simple as the player wants. There is some strategy in play too – should you attach multiple mines to one side of the ball for greater speed and height, or does it make more sense to lay them evenly across the ball? It’s not exactly a deep game, but the physics are on point and make planning almost as fun and exploding. It is just as easy to remove mines as it is to add them as well, so a misplaced one is not the end of the world.

Once it’s time for things to go boom, players can detonate said mines by hitting “1,” “2,” “3,” or “4.” It can be fun to see the ball go flying, but there is a learning curve in place. Newcomers will likely see their ball putter around, or fly in a direction that they don’t want it to go. However, the fact that you can detonate the mines whenever you want means that you can adjust the trajectory mid-flight. In addition, by holding down the right mouse button, players can slow things down. It takes some getting used to, and it’s not always intuitive, but it still makes for a fun time. Players are rewarded for going below par, along with other bonuses like the amount of airtime they get. It can be fun to see your score go up, and channels some arcade thrills.

Super Inefficient Golf - Gamers Heroes

The level design found here is somewhat unorthodox. Early holes are fairly straightforward affairs that look like they were designed more as a tutorial, but later levels force players to smash through walls, get vertical, and truly master the game. It’s a shame that there is no level editor in place here – getting through the entirety of the game does not take too long, and it would have been an easy thing to implement.

It’s just a shame that some of the worlds were not designed with the upmost care. Each flag hovers above each hole like magic, and some rocks in the scenery don’t offer feedback support. It can be frustrating to figure out what you can and cannot interact with.

Super Inefficient Golf lives as dies by its mine gimmick, but it is still a fun gimmick nonetheless. Those looking for a way to spice up their golf game can do far worse than this title, but don’t be surprised if it takes a while to get the hang of it.

This review of Super Inefficient Golf was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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