Thy Sword Review
Overall 5

The world of swords and sorcery might be primarily relegated to pen and paper, but titles like GamePhase’s Thy Sword channels the spirit of Dungeons & Dragons. Should you set a course for adventure, or is this one journey not worth taking?

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Thy Sword Review

The world of swords and sorcery might be primarily relegated to pen and paper, but titles like GamePhase’s Thy Sword channels the spirit of Dungeons & Dragons. Should you set a course for adventure, or is this one journey not worth taking?

Thy Sword Review

Thy Sword has got your usual assortment of fantasy style tropes. You’ve got hardened warriors, orcs, dragons, skeletons, and a healthy dose of action to guide you on your quest. The story is something diehard veterans will no doubt be acquainted with – after an unspeakable evil destroys a magic white crystal into five different pieces, it’s up to a Barbarian and a Valkyrie to bring them all together, defeat said evil, and bring peace to the last of Nhastans. It’s cliche and not worth seeking out, but it does serve as window dressing for the action that ensues.

Unfortunately, said action is a little repetitive. Each stage has players traversing a procedurally generated level made up of platforms and enemies in woods, mountains, caves, and other fantasy motifs. The goal is to make it through a series of days, defeating all enemies along the way. These enemies don’t have half a brain among them though – most of them just wander left and right, minding their own business until you get into attack range. Sure, some attacks are better blocked, and sure, sometimes an arrow will get the job done a bit better, but everything is just so ordinary.

Between each level, players can use the coins they received in battle in a village. Wares include potions, items that improve your platforming prowess, and additional arrows. Blackjack is also available for those looking for it. It’s a welcome feature, and it helps to break things up.

Thy Sword - Gamers Heroes

The platforming engine also feels wonky. Sword attacks cover a set range, and though it can be upgraded to a double jump, the main jump does not have much height. It can oftentimes feel like cleaning duty trying to take out all enemies, rather than a riveting experience. This somewhat extends to the boss fights. The spiders, dragons, sorcerers, and other forces of evil follow a set pattern, one that feels overly telegraphed.

However, being a roguelike, the game can be punishing on higher difficulties. Those looking for a challenge will lose their items and progress at a moment’s notice. An easier “Apprentice” difficulty mode is available, and players can expect to beat the game in a few hours using this mode.

Thy Sword feels more like a follower than a leader in the fantasy game and roguelike space. It does not do anything bad, but it does not do anything out of the ordinary either.

This review of Thy Sword was written based on the Steam version of the game. The game was purchased digitally.