WRC 6 Review
Overall 7

As the official rally title of the FIA World Rally Championship, Bigben Interactive and Kylotonn Games’ WRC 6 has some big shoes to fill. Is its world of twisty roads and time trials worth a go, or are you better off sitting this one out?

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WRC 6 Review

As the official rally title of the FIA World Rally Championship, Bigben Interactive and Kylotonn Games’ WRC 6 has some big shoes to fill. Is its world of twisty roads and time trials worth a go, or are you better off sitting this one out?

WRC 6 Review

Whether you’re a seasoned veteran or new to the world of rally racing, WRC 6 goes out of its way to make sure it has got something for everybody. After taking part in some trial races, the game will offer a number of suggested tweaks to improve your driving experience. Options like choosing between semi-automatic or manual, turning off damage (making it display only), or even changing the accent of your pacenotes reader are all available, and are welcome. The game is as complex as you want to be, and is better because of it.

Handling, even on its most flexible settings, takes some getting used to. There’s a nice sense of weight to each of the cars, and the dynamic conditions of each track (including mud, gravel, snow, and even nighttime settings) means that no two races are the same. Most cars have a terrible habit of fishtailing, so driving finesse is a must. Learning how to utilize your handbrake and understanding each course is key to coming out ahead, but those weaned on speed will need to get used to slowing down and mastering drifts. Those who find themselves off the track can manually reset their position to somewhere on the track in exchange for a penalty, but those looking for the perfect time are better off restarting their runs from scratch. There’s a bit of a learning curve present (even on easy), but there’s a zen-like sense of control once everything clicks.

WRC 6 - Gamers Heroes

Though WRC 6’s complete track and car list are available for play via its quick race mode, the meat of the game lies in its career mode. After signing on with a team (which vary depending on racing style), players can then race their way from WRC Junior, through the WRC 2 Class, and finally to the WRC itself. Special goals are thrown in every now and again, such as beating certain racers or placing higher than a certain rank, but the races themselves follow a calendar that is fairly linear. Repairs can be made between races, with a set of time allocated to each repair before time penalties accrue. Team morale and efficiency also comes into play in this mechanic, with successful performances leading to more efficient repairs between races. It’s a deep system, and while the endless string of races can sometimes get repetitive, the amount of things that can be tweaked adds some variety.

WRC 6 was also built with a number of online features. Though it is difficult to find a race online as of this writing, the leaderboards for each race are still available. There is also some eSport functionality, which has players compete in every rally of 2017. Players earn points for each round, and at the end of each season, the 10 best results make up your rank. Though it is not happening every week, there is support until the end of the year, which is a welcome sight.

WRC 6 is every bit as deep as you want it to be. While driving takes some getting used to, and the career mode is a bit straightforward, racers looking for the perfect time will find a lot to like here.

This review of WRC 6 was written based on the PlayStation 4 version of the game. A digital code was provided by the publisher.