Casey Scheld ReviewsGame ReviewsPC Reviews

A Long Time Review

Official Score

Overall - 50%

50%

Describing a game as abstract and surreal might make it seem like it is cutting edge, but A Long Time and its inoffensive world plays things far too safe. While it doesn't waste the players time, it also feels like there should be more to it.

User Rating: 4 ( 4 votes)

The clock is ticking with the release of Divivor’s A Long Time. Does this award-winning short abstract FPS make an impression, or is it not worth your time?

A Long Time Review

Ever wondered what time it is? That will absolutely not be a problem in the world of this game.

Everywhere you look, there’s a clock staring right back at you. Clocks of all shapes and sizes line its walls, with giant clocks, mirrored rooms of clocks, and other time pieces all glaring back at you. It’s practically inescapable, and therein lies the fun.

This title was designed as a unique audiovisual experience, one that even encourages players to put on a pair of headphones. While the dramatic piano tunes and abstract world are unique, it also proves to be a bit too minimalistic for its own good. White and light shades are the name of the game here, without much color to speak of.

This also holds true with its story segments, which are presented with white text on a black background. The game remains intentionally vague, and while it manages to be surreal, it also manages to make little sense. In all, it doesn’t leave a lasting impression, feeling almost sterile in the process. More color would have most definitely have been welcome here.

As the player, the protagonist maneuvers around its world with your standard WASD setup. Players can sprint and jump, and can interact with objects that bend and stretch every which way, but there are no threats to speak of. A Long Time’s world is a peaceful one, with the only threat being a fall down a bottomless pit. Even then, its plentiful checkpoints turn this seemingly awful fate into more of a minor setback.

Gameplay in A Long Time is pretty standard overall, with players traversing long stretches of hallways, jumping up stairs, and navigating different platforms. There’s one section in particular near the end of the game that requires some perilous platforming, but those weaned on the genre will have no trouble at all getting to the end in time. In all, it proves to be a relatively inoffensive experience that does nothing wrong, but also doesn’t go beyond what is needed either.

The entirety of the title can be completed in around 10 minutes, not overstaying its welcome. There are five achievements players can earn along the way, but outside of dying all can be completed through regular play.

Describing a game as abstract and surreal might make it seem like it is cutting edge, but A Long Time and its inoffensive world plays things far too safe. While it doesn’t waste the players time, it also feels like there should be more to it.

This review of A Long Time was done on the PC. The game was freely downloaded.
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Casey Scheld

Drawn to the underground side of gaming, Casey helps the lesser known heroes of video games. If you’ve never heard of it, he’s mastered it.
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