...
Casey Scheld ReviewsGame ReviewsPC Reviews

Driftpunk Racer Review

Official Score

Overall - 30%

30%

Driftpunk Racer’s small selection of tracks and poorly designed controls take away any semblance of enjoyment this game may have had. Don’t be fooled by its futuristic aesthetics - this racer’s a relic.

User Rating: Be the first one !

Futuristic cyberpunk meets 80s fashion with the release of Speedspark Studio’s Driftpunk Racer. Does it do enough to stand out, or are its retro aesthetics dated in more ways than one?

Driftpunk Racer Review

Players can more or less figure out what you need to do in this title. A racer that has players drifting along, players must skid across one of 10 neon-drenched cityscapes, gathering points along the way. Placing first among the four racers will get you absolutely nowhere – rather, the key to victory is to beat others with your drifting score.

There’s no need to hit those pesky brakes though – simply moving your car to the left or the right will cause a skid that would be right at home in Initial D. As you could imagine, this makes navigating each level difficult. Each stage has a number of curves that are designed for these moments, but it often feels like players have little control over the situation. This is made that much worse with the collision detection and invisible walls created to keep you on track – one bump and any semblance of momentum is thrown out the window. Those using a controller will have an even worse time, as everything is mapped to the analog stick. Holding it forward to move forward and back to brake makes absolutely no sense. Sure, players can enjoy this game one-handed, but it makes it next to impossible to accurately handle races.

It’s not like that will matter that much though, as each level is dreadfully short. With five levels set in the Blade Runner-esque Night Megapolis and five levels set in the Miami-inspired Neon Jungle, the average race takes around a minute. That is a bit on the generous side too – our fastest race clocked us in at 36 seconds. As a result, players can see everything this game has to offer in less time than it takes to watch a sitcom.

Driftpunk Racer - Gamers Heroes

There is some incentive to keep playing with its money system. All points are converted to cash, which can then be spent on two alternate rides, each with their own speed, acceleration, and handling ratings. Colors can also be unlocked, but there are not a ton of ways to modify your ride. Prices are a little steep as well – expect to do a number of those same short races to get enough dough.

It should be worth noting that the AI in this game is absolutely atrocious. When it is close to you, it is aggressive, and when it is far away, it finds a way to crash into a wall through its own volition. It can be hilarious to see a car skittishly scoot left and right in an attempt to drift, but the laughter abruptly stops when it tries to slow you down.

Driftpunk Racer’s small selection of tracks and poorly designed controls take away any semblance of enjoyment this game may have had. Don’t be fooled by its futuristic aesthetics – this racer’s a relic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIZl30Lsv_g

This review of Driftpunk Racer was done on Steam. The game was purchased digitally.
Spirit City: Lofi Sessions is a fantastic (and pun-tastic) tool that dishes out good vibes as players knock out their tasks. While the title could use more customization options, we enjoyed getting down to business in its cozy world.
The soldiers of Contra: Operation Galuga have the right moves for this mission, but the steep cost, short length, and awkward perspectives lead to a less-than-perfect execution.
The Legend of Zelda series of top-down titles is pretty rad. So is the shoot-em-up genre and its endless stream of bullets.
Variety is the spice of life in Million Monster Militia, providing sheer chaos with its synergies. While it takes some getting used when it comes to what goes where, those hankering for a good roguelike deckbuilder will enjoy positively obliterating these titans.

Casey Scheld

Casey Scheld has more than 15 years of experience in the gaming industry as a community manager, social media director, event specialist, and (of course) gaming editor. He has previously worked with gaming start-ups like Raptr, publishers like Konami, and roller derby girls at PAX West (check out Jam City Rollergirls)! Gamers Heroes is a passion project for him, giving him a chance to tap into the underground side of gaming. He is all too eager to give these lesser-known heroes of the indie space the attention they so rightly deserve, seeking out the next gem and sharing it with the world. Previously making appearances at events like CES, GDC, and (the late) E3, he is all too happy to seek out the next big thing. For those that want to talk shop, send over a tip, or get an easy win in a fighting game of their choosing, be sure to check out his social media channels below.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *