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Casey Scheld ReviewsGame ReviewsPC Reviews

Feather Review

Official Score

Overall - 70%

70%

Feather provides a relaxing experience that captures the spirit of classics like Flower and Journey. Though it does not offer much replayability, what is here is done well.

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Players will be as free as a bird with Samurai Punk’s new title Feather. Featuring a mellow experience and the ability to climb that mountain, should you take to the skies?

Feather Review

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Those expecting an open world full of icons and subquests might be surprised at how carefree Feather approaches things. Boot the game up, and players will be taking to the skies as a brown bird. There’s no UI, minimap, or objectives; rather, the entire world is free to explore.

Taking place on a fairly large island, a number of different topiaries are yours to explore. Snowcapped mountains, dark caves, seasides, forests, and more are free to explore. If you can navigate to it, you can see it – the sky is literally the limit. There’s no main objective in this title – there are some portals you can go through that change the music or transport you to the top of its world, but what you see is what you get.

Thankfully, the controls here are on point and are fairly intuitive. Those who have experience with Super Mario 64’s wing cap will take to the game like a bird to the skies. Movement is fluid and responsive, utilizing an inverse control scheme. The control scheme allows players to go faster, slower, or do a 180 if the situation calls for it. In a game that lives and dies by its controls, what is here gets the job done with flying colors. Note that controller support is included, and is our preferred way to play the game.

Feather - Gamers Heroes

Feather’s world won’t push the limits of your GPU – made up of low poly graphics, its aesthetics aren’t dated, but they’re not revolutionary either. This style works well for certain objects like reeds, but the trees can look somewhat blobby. The soft colors certainly complement the action, but don’t expect to be wowed either. The soundtrack, made up of soft piano and guitar melodies, fits the game like a glove and serves the game well.

This is a zero frustration game as well. Though certain obstacles can get in the way, the game prides itself by putting the player in perpetual motion. Should you come face first with a rock or other object, the game will go into a black and white form and rewind things to a few seconds before. A welcome feature, this prevents things from getting too frustrating.

It’s just a shame that it has little replayability. Outside of one achievement (which is earned from simply playing the game), there is little here to keep people coming back. A procedurally generated world, a snapshot mode, or even alternative birds would have been nice, but the experience here is fairly short lived.

Feather provides a relaxing experience that captures the spirit of classics like Flower and Journey. Though it does not offer much replayability, what is here is done well.

[infobox style=’success’ static=’1′]This review of Feather was done on Steam. A digital code was provided by the publisher.[/infobox]

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Casey Scheld

Casey Scheld has more than 15 years of experience in the gaming industry as a community manager, social media director, event specialist, and (of course) gaming editor. He has previously worked with gaming start-ups like Raptr, publishers like Konami, and roller derby girls at PAX West (check out Jam City Rollergirls)! Gamers Heroes is a passion project for him, giving him a chance to tap into the underground side of gaming. He is all too eager to give these lesser-known heroes of the indie space the attention they so rightly deserve, seeking out the next gem and sharing it with the world. Previously making appearances at events like CES, GDC, and (the late) E3, he is all too happy to seek out the next big thing. For those that want to talk shop, send over a tip, or get an easy win in a fighting game of their choosing, be sure to check out his social media channels below.

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