...
Casey Scheld ReviewsGame ReviewsPC Reviews

Fight of Animals Review

Official Score

Overall - 55%

55%

The concept of meme icons fighting one another will no doubt turn some heads, but this joke is just not taken far enough. The engine powering this bout for the ages is simply not built for the task, hampering its appeal.

User Rating: Be the first one !

A number of infamous critters enter the ring with Digital Crafter’s new fighter Fight of Animals. With a simple control scheme and meme magic for days, does it manage to be more than the sum of its parts?

Fight of Animals Review

Looking at the control scheme for this fighter, one would expect Fight of Animals to be a deep affair. Those familiar with the antics of the fighting game community will no doubt appreciate the ukemi recovery mechanic, dash cancels, and super skills the game has to offer.

However, when the action begins, one can see its more casual elements come into play. Quarter circle motions are thrown out in favor of directional inputs, and each character’s “Super Skill” can be activated with the press of a button. Comboing is a straightforward affair, with a combination of light and heavy attack combinations practically guaranteeing multiple blows. For those unfamiliar with the inner workings of the deeper fighters on the market, its pick-up-and-play stylings will no doubt appeal to the masses.

It’s just a shame that the engine powering this title comes across as awkward. Each of the animals that make up its roster feel heavy, even when dashing. However, if one of these characters takes to the air for an overhead attack, it feels somewhat floaty. This dissonance makes each bout feel uneven, like characters are not in complete control of their surroundings. Trying to line up one of the Skills to the character can often feel like a losing affair, especially when there is such a long windup period for each particular action.

Of course, a “meme” based game is only as good as its humor. Fight of Animals goes for the overt approach, filling its roster with the celebrities “Muscle Beluga,” “Walking Cat,” “Power Hook Dog,” “Mighty Fox,” “Magic Squirrel,” and “Crowrilla.” Their moveset lives up to their reputation too, with exaggerated attacks and poses a-plenty. It’s far from a laugh riot, but all those with a soul will at the very least have a smile on their face.

It’s just a shame that there’s not much game here. Outside of the six characters and three arenas, the action remains the same throughout. If anything, the concept could have been taken a bit farther – the dojo, playground, and boxing arena come across as generic, and even the announcer is just phoning it in. If one is going to explore the concept, it only makes sense for them to go all the way.

Note that the garden variety Arcade, Versus, and Training Modes make their appearance, and work as they should. There is also an Online Mode for those looking to battle other meme legends around the world, but nobody was online as of this review.

The concept of meme icons fighting one another will no doubt turn some heads, but this joke is just not taken far enough. The engine powering this bout for the ages is simply not built for the task, hampering its appeal.

This review of Fight of Animals was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
Spirit City: Lofi Sessions is a fantastic (and pun-tastic) tool that dishes out good vibes as players knock out their tasks. While the title could use more customization options, we enjoyed getting down to business in its cozy world.
The soldiers of Contra: Operation Galuga have the right moves for this mission, but the steep cost, short length, and awkward perspectives lead to a less-than-perfect execution.
The Legend of Zelda series of top-down titles is pretty rad. So is the shoot-em-up genre and its endless stream of bullets.
Variety is the spice of life in Million Monster Militia, providing sheer chaos with its synergies. While it takes some getting used when it comes to what goes where, those hankering for a good roguelike deckbuilder will enjoy positively obliterating these titans.

Casey Scheld

Casey Scheld has more than 15 years of experience in the gaming industry as a community manager, social media director, event specialist, and (of course) gaming writer. He has previously worked with gaming start-ups like Raptr, publishers like Konami, and roller derby girls at PAX West (check out Jam City Rollergirls)! Gamers Heroes is a passion project for him, giving him a chance to tap into the underground side of gaming. He is all too eager to give these lesser-known heroes of the indie space the attention they so rightly deserve, seeking out the next gem and sharing it with the world. Previously making appearances at events like CES, GDC, and (the late) E3, he is all too happy to seek out the next big thing. For those that want to talk shop, send over a tip, or get an easy win in a fighting game of their choosing, be sure to check out his social media channels below.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *