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Heal Hitler Review

Official Score

Overall - 85%

85%

The experimental nature of Heal Hitler pays off in dividends. By focusing squarely on the script, this visual novel features a real human element that makes every choice truly matter. Those looking for an enthralling tale with one of history’s most infamous dictators have certainly found it in this psychologists’ office.

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Players could very well change the world with Jon Aegis’ new title Heal Hitler, a dynamic new title that has players filling the shoes of Adolf Hitler’s psychologist. Using both Jungian and Freudian psychotherapy to get through to a hardened dictator is certainly a unique premise, but does it have the follow-through to provide an enthralling experience?

Heal Hitler Review

Set in 1925, players are given a heavy role right from the get-go. You’re Hitler’s psychologist, and you have been hired to help Hitler resolve past trauma and his anger issues. If players succeed, they could prevent the war. Fail, and all-out war will befall the world.

The game succeeds in engaging the player by giving Hitler a more human element. Everybody knows of his anti-semitic and anti-clericism viewpoints, but he also went through a lot. His mother passed away and his father beat him, and he also faced failure and cheated death after the Beer Hall Putsch.

There’s no denying that he’s a malicious and evil man, but finding the root of all of these issues is what makes this game so great. Players are given the choice between two different options at a number of key junctions, allowing this psychologist to probe into different parts of Hitler’s narrative. Some of the choices are clearly wrong, made to provoke a rise out of Hitler. Nevertheless, the tense atmosphere of dealing with a frustrated person in power will keep players on the edge of their seat as they navigate each session.

Heal Hitler is not unlike a visual novel, but the amount of polish is high. There’s not much to the presentation; most of it is spent watching two fairly still models in an office. However, the tense music and excellent voice acting really seal the deal. The game focuses on the core elements needed to make a game of this style stand out, and it does so with gusto. The development team stated that they wanted to make things as historically accurate as possible, and they certainly hit the history books when crafting its script. Outside of the odd typo, the written script is solid enough too.

The average playthrough lasts around 30 minutes, with the length depending on what dialog choices are made throughout the playthrough. We were deliberate with our choices, but were unable to get a good ending on our initial playthrough. Those looking for the true ending will no doubt come back to Heal Hitler multiple times to figure out the best way to cure his trauma. A number of achievements can also be unlocked, depending on what players choose to say.

The experimental nature of Heal Hitler pays off in dividends. By focusing squarely on the script, this visual novel features a real human element that makes every choice truly matter. Those looking for an enthralling tale with one of history’s most infamous dictators have certainly found it in this psychologists’ office.

This review of Heal Hitler was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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Casey Scheld

Drawn to the underground side of gaming, Casey helps the lesser known heroes of video games. If you’ve never heard of it, he’s mastered it.
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