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Indecision. Review

Official Score

Overall - 50%

50%

Indecision. is one of those titles that is unique for the sake of being unique. Players may not have seen what it has to offer before in other titles, but its cryptic gameplay ultimately takes away from the title when all is said and done.

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Bilge Kaan throws players to the wolves in his new title Indecision. Featuring a few dozen different scenarios and absolutely no context, should you try to decipher this enigma?

Indecision. Review

Gamers have gotten used to spoonfeeding and handholding in their games, with quest markers a-plenty and enough notifications to choke a horse. Indecision. says nuts to all of that and forces players to fight their way through the title through trial and error. Part platformer, part art piece, this is one title that forces players to progress by exhausting every last option.

This can be seen right from the get-go; though only four directions can be chosen from in the first screen, players must ultimately “break” the game in order to progress. This proves to be an ongoing trend, and it lives up to its tagline of “short and vague.”

The entirety of the game is made up of a number of different scenarios, each with a one-word description. Some areas make sense – get to the exit or get the boulder to the top of the hill. However, the development team likes to subvert your expectations. One would think holding right would progress said boulder up the hill, but it’s opposite day and the key to success is through the road less traveled.

It’s certainly unique, but it comes at the cost of being a bit too frustrating. Some areas try your patience, forcing you to backtrack or find a way to navigate platforms that don’t exist as pixels. It is easy enough to finish each area if you know what to do – it usually takes no more than a minute – but the end result for us was relief rather than satisfaction. As a result, it often felt like an exercise in tedium. Some areas prove to be obnoxious as well – there are scenes where players hit a button in order to have poop come out or disrupt the worship of a teapot (pictured above). It just comes off as immature, like an in-joke the player is not privy to.

One might consider this an artistic experiment, but it often feels like there is no context or point to anything that is going on. One section might have a marathon, while another has the player in free-fall. The pixelated graphics get the job done, but it lacks the attention-to-detail found in other games like Gris or Journey.

It’s not like it matters much in the grand scheme of things, as this title is overly short by design. From start to finish (and through a fair bit of trial and error), we were able to complete Indecision. in around 30 minutes. There are some achievements tied to the game, but we were left confused when the credits started to roll.

Indecision. is one of those titles that is unique for the sake of being unique. Players may not have seen what it has to offer before in other titles, but its cryptic gameplay ultimately takes away from the title when all is said and done.

This review of Indecision. was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.
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Casey Scheld

Casey Scheld has more than 15 years of experience in the gaming industry as a community manager, social media director, event specialist, and (of course) gaming editor. He has previously worked with gaming start-ups like Raptr, publishers like Konami, and roller derby girls at PAX West (check out Jam City Rollergirls)! Gamers Heroes is a passion project for him, giving him a chance to tap into the underground side of gaming. He is all too eager to give these lesser-known heroes of the indie space the attention they so rightly deserve, seeking out the next gem and sharing it with the world. Previously making appearances at events like CES, GDC, and (the late) E3, he is all too happy to seek out the next big thing. For those that want to talk shop, send over a tip, or get an easy win in a fighting game of their choosing, be sure to check out his social media channels below.

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