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Casey Scheld ReviewsGame ReviewsPC Reviews

NeverSynth Review

Official Score

Overall - 30%

30%

NeverSynth is a rhythm game without rhythm, with procedurally generated courses that don’t quite match up. While it is great to rock out to your own tunes, those looking for near infinite fun best stick with the Audiosurf series.

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Players will be able to enter a world that fuses neon, rhythm, and driving with the release of Whale Rock Games’ NeverSynth. Is it time to feel the rhythm of the night, or is this one destined for the highway to hell?

NeverSynth Review

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A rhythm game where the music doesn’t stop, players can choose from an infinite number of tracks – as long as those tracks are stored locally on your computer. Armed with a number of locally downloaded songs (thank you Deezer!), we ended up grooving to All Good Funk Alliance, Kero Kero Bonito, and Passion Pit as we cruised across the skyscrapers, palm coast, highway, tunnel, neon, and dawn.

Those who have hit the lanes of Amplitude or have moved to the groove in Beatmania will know the drill – move your car along to the beat, go for a high score, and avoid any obstacles or dissonance along the way. A full clear is always a welcome sight.

However, NeverSynth struggles with the fundamentals. As players are driving their car along each of these tracks, they’ll come to a dire conclusion quite quickly – the music doesn’t quite match the charts. We originally thought it was a one-off when we first started playing, but the problem reared its ugly head across multiple tracks. As a result, it can be hard for one to find their groove – doubly so if they come across an obstacle that muffles each song.

This is made that much worse with the way each lane is set up. Players can move to the left or the right in NeverSynth across one lane at a time, but there are times where notes will be at opposite ends or each other – a rough predicament that has no clear solution. This procedurally generated setup means that there is no rhyme, rhythm, or reason to these proceedings, leading players to feel like there is no point to it all.

NeverSynth doesn’t make much of a compelling case to come back either. Players can collect money by hitting each note, all while avoiding obstacles that take away $50 of said cash. From there, additional tracks can be unlocked along with Crown Vics and other unlicensed vehicles simply labeled as “car.” It reeks of laziness, and one can tell that this is a templated project in a graphics engine rather than a true passion project.

However, it is worth noting that NeverSynth is a looker. We live and breathe the 80s, and the title’s sharp visuals really stand out on an OLED TV. It’s not the most complex title to hit the market, but we did appreciate its razzle dazzle – even if it is lacking in personality.

NeverSynth is a rhythm game without rhythm, with procedurally generated courses that don’t quite match up. While it is great to rock out to your own tunes, those looking for near infinite fun best stick with the Audiosurf series.

[infobox style=’success’ static=’1′]This review of NeverSynth was done on the PC. The game was purchased digitally.[/infobox]

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Casey Scheld

Casey Scheld has more than 15 years of experience in the gaming industry as a community manager, social media director, event specialist, and (of course) gaming editor. He has previously worked with gaming start-ups like Raptr, publishers like Konami, and roller derby girls at PAX West (check out Jam City Rollergirls)! Gamers Heroes is a passion project for him, giving him a chance to tap into the underground side of gaming. He is all too eager to give these lesser-known heroes of the indie space the attention they so rightly deserve, seeking out the next gem and sharing it with the world. Previously making appearances at events like CES, GDC, and (the late) E3, he is all too happy to seek out the next big thing. For those that want to talk shop, send over a tip, or get an easy win in a fighting game of their choosing, be sure to check out his social media channels below.

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