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Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game – Complete Edition Review

Official Score

Overall - 70%

70%

Barring its numerous bugs and shoddy netcode, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game - Complete Edition captures the spirit of the IP quite well. The leveling system makes the title a bit of a cakewalk, but the presentation makes up for its shortcomings.

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Everything old is new again with the release of Ubisoft’s Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game – Complete Edition. Featuring a cult classic IP, a chiptune soundtrack by Anamanaguchi, and sprite work by Paul Robertson, does this beat-em-up have what it takes to win over the hearts of gamers once more?

Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game – Complete Edition Review

The titular Scott Pilgrim has his heart set on one thing: Ramona Flowers. In order to win the heart of this blue-haired beauty, he sets out on an epic quest to defeat her seven evil ex-boyfriends. Seems fitting that this premise translates well to the world of video games, right?

As players hit the snowy streets of Toronto, they’ll have to bash heads with any and all who stand in Scott’s way. Combos are the name of the game here – a fast and strong attack can be used to juggle ne’er-do-wells into oblivion, and Gut Points can be used to perform Super Attacks and call the always available Knives Chau for an assist.

It might seem like something that’s been done since the days of River City Ransom on the Nintendo Entertainment System, but what is present here works well and packs enough depth to keep players captivated. Blocks, dashes, sidesteps, and taunts make for some speedy gameplay with depth, and players can pick up the pace by getting “in the zone” by knocking out five enemies in succession. Aggressive play is an absolute must, and even the most cautious of players will enjoy the sheer kinetic energy that comes from clearing out a nightclub of thugs.

There is one wrinkle that makes Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game stand out: Its leveling system. Players will be able to collect XP along the way, and each level grants Scott a new ability. A level one neophyte will have enough tools to get the job done, but those who max out their Scott to level 16 can find themselves doing judo throws, counters, and head stomps at the drop of a hat.

While it’s great that this leveling system keeps things fresh, it also manages to be a weakness. Balance is a tricky thing in this title; those struggling to clear out a movie set or take down The Twins can just go back to a previous level to beat up lowly mooks to their heart’s content. It’s fairly easy to reach the max cap before too long, and it makes the rest of the game a breeze. When paired with the accessories from each of the shops, one can make their character an absolute beast before the credits roll. There are higher difficulty settings available for those who like a challenge, but this system takes away from the title when all is said and done.

It’s just a shame that this port job is sloppy. Crashes, muffled sound, and lines across the screen in every level (see the picture above) take away from the presentation. The online mode could use some serious work as well – not only do players have to sign up for a Ubisoft Account, the network may have well have been made up of tin cans and string. Disconnects are frequent, matchmaking worked twice in the 20+ times we tried it, and there is enough lag to the point of it being a nuisance. It’s bad enough with two people, but with four players on the screen, it’s borderline unplayable.

The core game can be completed in a couple of hours, but there are a few additions to keep players coming back. Leaderboards are available, along with Boss Rush, Survival Horror (which has players fighting zombies for as long as possible), Battle Royal (a versus mode in a wrestling ring), and Dodge Ball modes. These modes won’t keep players engaged for hours on end, but they are serviceable additions that will keep players amused for a short amount of time.

Barring its numerous bugs and shoddy netcode, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game – Complete Edition captures the spirit of the IP quite well. The leveling system makes the title a bit of a cakewalk, but the presentation makes up for its shortcomings.

This review of Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game – Complete Edition was done on the PlayStation 4. A digital code was provided by the publisher.
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Casey Scheld

Drawn to the underground side of gaming, Casey helps the lesser known heroes of video games. If you’ve never heard of it, he’s mastered it.
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